Dog Walks in Stow-on-the-Wold

  • Adults Ages 13 or more Children Ages 2 - 12 Infants Under 2
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Dog Walks in Stow-on-the-Wold

In the north Cotswold’s, all roads lead to the hill-top town Stow-on-the-Wold. A picture-perfect quintessentially British town surrounded by history, pleasurable stays, and the countries oldest Inn. What’s more, there are plenty of long and short walks allowing your furry friend to stretch their legs!

So here are 5 of our favorite British walks with gorgeous countryside, in and around Stow-on-the-Wold, rated by us. Remember, if you build up an appetite from all your substantial walking, we offer a real hearty pub lunch, and of course, we’re dog friendly.

 

The Maugersbury Walk
Digbeth Street, Stow-on-the-Wold
Rating: 4 Stars

For a short walk with plenty of typically Cotswold-like scenes and ample views, the Maugersbury walk is perfect for you. A fun little brisk walk, with traditional Cotswold stone walls, plush green fields and more than enough space for your dog to run for miles.

Walk Duration: 45 mins to one hour.
Starting Point: The Market Square, Digbeth Street.
Terrain: Flat, but a little muddy during rainy times!

Distance: 4.5 miles
What’s There: nearby car parking (the coach park), on lead areas, and suitable for large prams.

 

The Town Trail
Stow-on-the-Wold
Rating: 4 Stars

An ideal spot for a quick walk with well-behaved doggies (best kept on leads as there is light traffic). Take an interesting stroll around the historic town and pass ST Edwards Church, the stocks and end up outside The Porch House, the oldest inn in the country, dating back to 947AD! Certainly, a stroll for a puppy, a smaller or elderly dog with less energy.

Walk Duration: 30 mins
Starting Point: Near the racecourse at Seven Meadows Road
Terrain: Slightly uneven pavements, but mainly flat.
Distance: 1 mile
What’s There: parking spots everywhere, a fudge shop, a dog-friendly pub & the world’s oldest inn!

 

The Gloucestershire Way
Stow-on-the-Wold
Rating: 5 Stars

A long walk through the infamous contrasting landscape of Gloucestershire. There are three distinct sections to this route, but we recommend starting in Stow-on-the-Wold and continuing through the rolling hills and steep valleys of the Cotswold’s to Winchcombe-Tewkesbury. To make your walk even more legendary, we suggest booking an overnight stay at The Sheep or The Porch House for a well-earned relaxing evening.

Walking Duration: Easily several hours
Starting Point: The Information Centre
Terrain: Tricky, with steep hills and flats (best for confident walkers!)
Distance: 12 – 24 miles
What’s There: Miles and miles of challenging landscapes…and parking.

 

The Ancient Stow Well
Stow-on-the-Wold
Rating: 4 Stars

A delightful short walk consisting of green meadows and fields in every direction. There is plenty of opportunities to let your dog run free (and children too?) Of course, a popular element of this walk is the ancient well, which is still active, and water was brought up to Stow’s town center until the last century! Enjoy the lovely views over green fields and see Stow on the Wold from a very different direction.

Starting Point: The town center

Terrain: Easy walking, no problem with prams. Fine in any weather condition
Distance: Approx. 1 Mile
What’s There: Car parking, an ancient well, woodlands, on and off lead areas.

 

The Lower Slaughter Mill Walk
Lower Slaughter to Stow-on-the-Wold
Rating: 5 stars

An intermediate walk, best for those sure-footed individuals, ready to tackle a range of terrains. Dogs will adore the freedom here with streams, canals, and plenty of fields to roam and explore. The route also brings you through Bourton-on-the-Water, another utterly stunning country village known as Venice of the Cotswold’s.

Starting Point: Lower Slaughter
Terrain: Tricky terrains with a mild challenge!
Distance: 9.1 miles
What’s There: Accessible with public transport, cafes, restrooms, and pubs along the route.

 

If you decide you’ve had enough walking for one day and need a refreshing beverage or a jolly-good heart-warming meal, pop into The Porch House. For a roaring fireplace with medieval markings, wonky ceilings, and head-banging door frames (watch out!) you can feel the history as soon as you walk in. The Porch House offers a range of classic dishes, from the Winter Ploughman’s sharing board to a remake of the nation’s favourite dish, Ale-battered haddock with chunky chips. Oh, and don’t forget we’re experts in the Great British Institution that is the mighty Sunday Roast.

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